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Con-Cor Penn Central MP-54 Scheme A non-Powered Combine Car. MINT


Con-Cor Penn Central MP-54 Scheme A non-Powered Combine Car. MINT
Con-Cor Penn Central MP-54 Scheme A non-Powered Combine Car. MINT
Con-Cor Penn Central MP-54 Scheme A non-Powered Combine Car. MINT
Con-Cor Penn Central MP-54 Scheme A non-Powered Combine Car. MINT
Con-Cor Penn Central MP-54 Scheme A non-Powered Combine Car. MINT

Con-Cor Penn Central MP-54 Scheme A non-Powered Combine Car. MINT    Con-Cor Penn Central MP-54 Scheme A non-Powered Combine Car. MINT

HO Scale Con-Cor Penn Central MP-54 Scheme "A" non-Powered Combine Car #4553. In 1906, the Pennsylvania Railroad announced the construction of all new steel passenger cars to replace their wooden cars. These came at the right time.

The Pennsy was building tunnels under the Hudson and East Rivers to link New Jersey with the coming Penn Station in New York, and the wooden cars were not allowed in the tunnels due to the hazard of fire. The cars were 64 ft in length and had seating for 72 in a 54 ft space, thus the classification they received: P54. The Pennsy anticipated using these cars in electronically powered multiple-unit (MU) services, so they were designed to accommodate electrical equipement and motors. Those units would become the Motor Passenger cars: the MP-54. Between 1908 and 1930, the Long Island Railroad received 626 Motor cars. These cars were powered using a 650 V DC their rail system. A number of newer cars were delivered with round arch roofs. These were classified as "Ping Pong" cars, due to the extreme rough ride.

The Pennsy received 487 Motor cars and trailer cars between 1910 and 1937. The motor cars were powered using an 11,000 V 25Hz AC overhead catenary system. They were all equipped with electric heat, cab signals, automatic train control and had a top speed of 65 mph. The Pennsy's MP-54's were designed more for efficiency and standardization than comfort for the passengers.

Each motor car was powered by a single truck under the pantograph end which was equipped with a 200-horsepower AC motor. This type of motor resulted in poor acceleration which proved problematic with the frequent stops while used in local commuter service. The trucks design provided a rather rough ride.

Noise from the primitive toothed gear drivetrain could become extremely loud at higher speeds, which often encouraged passengers to ride in the non-powered trailer cars. The PRR utilized their MP-54's up until the merger with the New York Central, a number of them ran in Penn Central service, and few lucky motor cars found their way into SEPTA service. The LIRR ran their MP-54's until 1971. Between 1968 and 1976, PC was also exclusive operator of the Northeast Corridor, where former PRR electric locomotives led fast, frequent trains-including the next-generation Metroliners-between New York City and Washington, D. Leading the Afternoon Congressional through South Newark, N. For many years model of these iconic cars were offered only in Brass in HO scale.

Alco models, a brass model train company offered and made the MP-54's prior to the con-cor models. The Alco models are sought after and at the time, they were great representations of the real MP-54's. MP-54's were also offered in a kit form by Funaro & Camerlengo prior to the recent factory made Con-Cor models. In 2012 Con-Cor announced and made the MP-54's in plastic. The cars come with excellent details and LED's lights.

This includes full interiors with lights. They also come in PRR, PC, LIRR, and Septa paint schemes. The early versions of these cars in locomotive hauled form are offered in other road names. The Con-Cor models were made in a limited numbers. HO Scale Con-Cor Penn Central MP-54 Green paint Scheme "B" non-Powered Combine Car #4553.

Features of the 2018 Con Cor MP-54. Accurate dimensions per Pennsy Railroad plans. Complete Underbody Details (Many individual pieces). Industry Compatible working Knuckle couplers.

Working Headlights at each end of the cars. Built in Interior factory lighting Works in either DC, or DCC automatically.

Both Trucks have photo etched pilots factory mounted. Accurate paint schemes Per PRR Historical Society and other reference materials per time era. Images #1 through #8 are actual model in Mint condition.

Image #10 is from the collection of -Eddie Wells Jr- to show lighting. All other images are stock Con Cor Images that may or may not reflect the car number 4559 or 4558. Compare these prices to the brass models mentioned. The Con-Cor is a good deal and not only that, you get a model that runs well and has full interior. Overall these are great models for the price.

Con-Cor's versions of these distinctive cars are well-detailed, smooth-running models worth a spot at your passenger platforms.
Con-Cor Penn Central MP-54 Scheme A non-Powered Combine Car. MINT    Con-Cor Penn Central MP-54 Scheme A non-Powered Combine Car. MINT